Scuba Diving in the Bahamas

 

The pristine turquoise waters around Harbour Island in the Bahamas boast some of the best scuba diving in the entire archipelago. Shallow sandy bays give way to brilliant coral gardens, underwater grottoes, sea caves, and a wealth of historic shipwrecks along The Devil’s Backbone (the reef that stretches from Eleuthera to Harbour Island), all of it perfect for exploring in the warm waters of the Caribbean beneath a tropical sky. Whether you are a novice or an expert diver, you can count on engaging and professional tours from the local dive operators, all of whom are happy to cater to your vacation desires. Dive charters include single and double tank dives with the newest equipment, all aboard top-of-the-line dive boats. Read on to learn more about scuba diving in the Bahamas!

The Devil’s Backbone

Ranging from 10 to 35’ in depth, this striking ridge of coral heads and barrier reefs is as beautiful as it was deadly to vessels at the turn of the 20th century. Such shallow depths mean you will have plenty of bottom time to explore such wrecks as the Carnarvon, a 186-foot long freighter with intact propellers and anchors that make for excellent photo ops; the Cienfuegos, a passenger ship that went down in 1895 for reasons unknown (no lives were lost); and the Arimorda, a freighter that is no home to a surprising number of fish who love to ogle divers nearly as much as divers love to ogle them.

The Arch

At the southern end of the island is the breathtaking topography of “The Arch,” an underwater archway encrusted with sea fans and corals. Explore the interior of the archway and enjoy the ride on the surge channels while hanging out with larger pelagic species like grouper, sharks, and eagle rays. Lobsters and moray eels are commonly seen lurking in the shadowy recesses, while smaller, colorful reef fish teem around the entrance. A cleaning station at about 65’ is a perennial highlight of this scuba Bahamas hotspot.

Hammerhead Point

Formed by wave action and falling rock formations from nearby Current Island, this site for scuba diving in the Bahamas is famed for a large hole in the bedrock that is a popular gathering spot for turtles, sharks, and rays. The unique topography is interesting in its own right, but it also provides plenty of shelter for the Caribbean reef fish that call the area home.

Sea Garden

Aptly named, this colorful field of coral heads, sea fans, and soft corals dazzles in the warm sunlight. Home to an incredibly diverse array of marine life, you can count on seeing spotted eagle rays, tropical reef fish, moray eels, octopus, parrotfish, and sharks on your scuba Bahamas adventure.